Georgia

Your Vote's Safety in Georgia

Requires strict
photo ID

Voter Laws and Registration Deadlines

You must:

  • Be a citizen of the United States
  • Be a legal resident of Georgia and of the county in which you want to vote
  • Be 18 years old within six months after the day of registration, and be 18 years old by election day
  • Not be serving a sentence for having been convicted of a felony
  • Not have been judicially determined to be mentally incompetent, unless the disability has been removed
  • STRICT PHOTO ID REQUIRED — approved by DOJ in 2005
  • Early Voting in Person or by Mail

Registration Deadline: The fifth Monday before any general primary, general election, or presidential preference primary, or regularly scheduled special election pursuant to the Georgia Election Code. In the event that a special election is scheduled on a date other than those dates prescribed by the Georgia Election Code, registration would close on the 5th day after the call.

State Election Information

State Legislature Page

Court Activity

Arizona Ruling Partly Blocks Georgia Voter ID Law

News & Commentary

Georgia Secretary of State Probing Possible Vote Fraud | 09/10/14

Georgia Secretary of State Brian Kemp (R) said Tuesday his office was investigating allegations of voter fraud by a group led by the state's Democratic House minority leader that it believes may have forged voter registration documents and signatures and filled out voter applications with false information.

Kemp said in a memo obtained by WSBTV that his office has received complaints about the group in five counties in northern Georgia outside Atlanta -- Barow, Butts, DeKalb, Gwinnett, Henry, and Muscogee -- and sent subpoenas to the New Georgia Project and Third Sector Development, its parent organization, led by Georgia Rep. Stacey Abrams (D).

"We're just not going to put up with fraud," Kemp told WSBTV. "I mean, we have zero tolerance for that in Georgia, so we've opened an investigation and served some subpoenas."

Read more.

Resisting the Siren Song of Voting 'Reform' | 06/09/14

As the nation gears up for crucial midterm congressional elections in November, another "reform" proposal has emerged, with lawmakers hearing the predictable siren song of "go along, or be accused of racism."

That's a scary threat when a charge of racial bigotry -- real or imagined -- has enormous power.

In such a hothouse liberal-media culture, Democrats have managed to persuade an ordinarily sensible Republican, Wisconsin's Rep. F. James Sensenbrenner Jr., to take leave of his senses and sponsor this bad legislation.

The Voting Rights Amendment Act of 2014 (H.R. 3899, S. 1945) was introduced in January as a response to the U.S. Supreme Court decision in Shelby v. Holder on June 25, 2013, invalidating one part of the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Liberals are pressuring congressional leaders of both parties to enact this legislative "fix."

On June 4, more than 80 liberal religious groups sent a letter to Congress urging passage.

The original law required the U.S. Justice Department or a D.C.-based federal court panel to preclear any voting-law changes in nine mostly Southern states and local jurisdictions in six others. Enacted with huge majorities in both houses of Congress, the statute eliminated Jim Crow laws that had discriminated against blacks since the days of Reconstruction after the Civil War. The law was a crucial, effective component of the civil rights campaign to end racial discrimination.

In recent years, however, evidence has piled up that Section 5 is being abused by a politicized Justice Department. The Supreme Court rightly noted that Section 4, which justified and required unequal treatment of some states under Section 5, could no longer pass constitutional muster because it relied on nearly 50-year-old, obsolete data.

Read more of Robert Knight's Washington Times column,

Sensenbrenner Caught on Camera Denying Text of Own Voter Law | 03/18/14

Rep. Jim Sensenbrenner (R., Wisc.) told constituents at Wisconsin town halls that voting-rights legislation he is sponsoring does not exclude white voters from the protection of the Voting Rights Act. Sensenbrenner also says he is proud to work with the ACLU and far-left groups to pass the legislation that would resurrect Attorney General Eric Holder's powers to block state election laws such as voter ID or citizenship verification.

In a video from Project Veritas founder James O'Keefe, Sensenbrenner also accused Texas and Georgia Republicans of trying to stop minorities from voting.

Read more of J. Christian Adams' article at NRO.

Primaries Offer First Test of New Voter ID Laws | 03/03/14

WASHINGTON (AP) -- In elections that begin this week, voters in 10 states will be required to present photo identification before casting ballots -- the first major test of voter ID laws after years of legal challenges arguing that the measures are designed to suppress voting.

The first election is March 4 in Texas, followed by nine other primaries running through early September that will set the ballot for the midterm elections in November, when voters decide competitive races for governor and control of Congress.

The primaries will be closely watched by both sides of the voter ID debate, which intensified in 2011, the year after Republicans swept to power in dozens of statehouses.

Read more.

States Seek Right to Ask New Voters for Citizenship Proof | 01/22/14

States are vowing to go to the courts for permission to ask newly registered voters to show proof of citizenship after a federal commission ruled on Jan. 17 that it's up to the national government, not states, to decide what to include on registration forms.

Under the motor-voter law, federal officials distribute voter-registration forms in all of the states. Arizona, Kansas and Georgia all asked that those forms request proof of citizenship, but the federal Election Assistance Commission rejected that in a 46-page ruling released late Friday, just ahead of a court-imposed deadline.

Read more.

Holder: Feds Will Sue over Voter ID, but Not over Weed | 09/04/13

Mississippi columnist Sid Salter:  Seems U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder is fully prepared to sue Southern states over Voter ID laws, but is not willing to sue Colorado and Washington in their efforts to legalize and regulate recreational marijuana.

Holder's logic is apparently that while states should have lots of leeway on how they deal with enforcement of federal laws against smoking and selling weed, states should not have that same leeway when it comes to efforts to fight perceived voter fraud.

Read more.

Arizona Ruling Partly Blocks Georgia Voter ID Law | 07/02/13

Last week's U.S. Supreme Court ruling partly blocks Georgia from enforcing a law requiring would-be voters to prove U.S. citizenship, Secretary of State Brian Kemp said.

In a 7-2 decision on June 24, the court ruled a similar statute in Arizona is pre-empted by federal law. Passed in 2009, Georgia's law requires voter registration applicants to provide proof of U.S. citizenship, such as copies of passports or birth certificates.

Read more.

Betrayal by Any Other Name | 03/19/12

This column by ACRU Senior Fellow Robert Knight was published March 19, 2012 in The Washington Times.

What would you call it if some Americans went overseas to the United Nations Human Rights Council and gave aid and comfort to some of the most repressive regimes on the planet?

What if they falsely accused America of suppressing the vote of racial minorities because some states require voter photo ID and other measures to deter fraud?

I'd call it "treason," but you also could say it's just liberal politics as usual.

Continue reading “Betrayal by Any Other Name”.

Lessons from the Voter ID Experience in Georgia | 03/19/12

The latest data compiled by the Secretary of State of Georgia, Brian Kemp, about the state's experience with voter ID once again shows that the claims by opponents of voter ID are wrong.
Click here for full article.

Voter Fraud in This Life and the Next | 02/17/12

This column by ACRU Senior Fellow Robert Knight was published February 17, 2012 in The Washington Times.

Did you know that according to a new Pew study, more than 1.8 million dead people are registered to vote? And that leading Democrats are fiercely opposing new laws that tighten voting requirements?

This tells us, just as we suspected, that the zombie population is becoming a major Democratic constituency.

Continue reading “Voter Fraud in This Life and the Next”.

Voter ID Terrifies Democrats | 12/30/11

This column by ACRU Senior Fellow Robert Knight was published December 30, 2011 in The Washington Times.

The most consequential election in our lifetime is still 10 months away, but it's clear from the Obama administration's order halting South Carolina's new photo ID law that the Democrats already have brought a gun to a knife fight.

How else to describe this naked assault on the right of a state to create minimal requirements to curb vote fraud?

On Dec. 23, Assistant Attorney General Thomas E. Perez sent a letter ordering South Carolina to stop enforcing its photo ID law. Mr. Perez, who heads the Civil Rights Division that booted charges against the New Black Panther Party for intimidating voters in Philadelphia in 2008, said South Carolina's law would disenfranchise thousands of minority voters.

South Carolina Attorney General Alan Wilson rejected Mr. Perez's math and explained on Fox News why the law is necessary. The state Department of Motor Vehicles audited a state Election Commission report that said 239,333 people were registered to vote but had no photo ID. The DMV found that 37,000 were deceased, more than 90,000 had moved to other states, and others had names not matched to IDs. That left only 27,000 people registered without a photo ID but who could vote by signing an affidavit as to their identity.

Continue reading “Voter ID Terrifies Democrats”.

Playing the Race Card before Election Day | 12/16/11

This column by ACRU Senior Fellow Robert Knight was published December 16, 2011 in The Washington Times.

Is it racist to require people to show a photo ID when they vote? You need a photo ID for nearly any meaningful transaction, such as cashing checks, including government checks. If this simple requirement "suppresses" the vote, maybe we need to ask why it's such a great idea to push for universal suffrage for every adult who is merely breathing.

Of course, even this latter requirement would suppress the vote in Chicago and New Orleans, where dead people get to vote all the time - and do so cheerfully.

In a speech Tuesday at the Lyndon Baines Johnson Library and Museum in Austin, Texas, Attorney General Eric H. Holder, Jr. warned that recent state reforms, such as requiring photo IDs, might repress the minority vote. He said the Justice Department was reviewing photo ID laws just enacted in Texas and South Carolina and early-voting procedures in Florida.

The overall implication of his otherwise elegant speech commemorating passage of the 1965 Voting Rights Act is that tightening voter requirements is more of a threat to the integrity of the system than vote fraud.

Continue reading “Playing the Race Card before Election Day”.